Fitness Health & Lifestyle

Menopause and healthy heart

Washington [US], (ANI): Postmenopausal women who report a faster walking pace had a lower risk of developing heart failure, a new study has found. The study has been published in the ‘Journal of the American Geriatrics Society’.Among 25,183 women ages 50-79 years, there were 1,455 heart failure hospitalisation cases during a median follow-up of 16.9 years. Compared with women who walked at a casual pace, those who walked at an average pace or a fast pace had 27 per cent and 34 per cent lower risks of heart failure, respectively. Fast walking for less than 1 hour per week was associated with the same risk reduction of heart failure as average or casual walking for more than 2 hours per week. “This study confirms other studies demonstrating the importance of walking speed on mortality and other cardiovascular outcomes,” said senior author Charles B. Eaton,…

Food Health & Lifestyle

Calcium is good for heart as well : STUDY FINDS

Suita [Japan], January 23 (ANI): The human heart, the size of a fist, located just behind and slightly left of the breastbone, tirelessly beats an average of 100,000 times a day. However, conditions that stop the heart from pumping blood efficiently can cause serious problems and ultimately require a heart transplantation. In a study published in the journal ‘Science Translational Medicine’, researchers from Osaka University showed that a previously unknown mutation can lead to a condition called dilated cardiomyopathy, which is one of the main causes of heart failure.Heart failure refers to an incurable condition where the heart is no longer able to meet the body’s demands in terms of blood supply. It is one of the most common causes of death and it affects almost 40 million people worldwide, representing a huge public health problem. One of the main factors leading to heart…

Fitness Health & Lifestyle

Yoga To Keep Your Heart Healthy

Yoga improves the circulation of blood and oxygen in the body and brings down stress levels. Here are asanas, mudras and pranayama techniques for better heart health. Yoga, with its combination of poses, breathing exercises and meditation techniques has been attracting people of all age groups thanks to its many health benefits. The ancient practice has been gaining popularity not only as a fitness and wellness regime but also as an adjunct therapy in treating many health disorders from arthritis to heart disease. The scientific benefits of Yoga have been acknowledged by several health studies. Yoga improves the circulation of blood and oxygen in the body. It is also known to thin the blood which can decrease the risk of heart attack and stroke as they are often caused by blood clots, according to the International Journal of Yoga (IJOY). It also increases blood flow and…

Fitness Health & Lifestyle

Stress Signal From Fat Cells Could Help Protect The Heart From Obesity’s Negative Consequences

A stress signal received by the heart from fat could help protect against cardiac damage induced by obesity, a new study led by the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center researchers suggests. The finding, published online in Cell Metabolism, could help explain the “obesity paradox,” a phenomenon in which obese individuals have better short- and medium-term cardiovascular disease prognoses compared with those who are lean, but with ultimately worse long-term outcomes. “The mechanism we have identified here could be one of many that protect the heart in obesity,” said study leader Philipp E. Scherer, Ph.D., Professor of Internal Medicine and Cell Biology at UTSW who has long studied fat metabolism. Study co-leader Clair Crewe, Ph.D., Assistant Instructor of Internal Medicine at UTSW, explained that the metabolic stress of obesity gradually makes fat tissue dysfunctional, causing its mitochondria – the cellular organelles that generate energy…