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Study: Income Inequality May Harm Child’s Performance In Maths, But Not Reading

Washington [US], January 15 (ANI): A new comprehensive study has found that children of houses of income inequality might have a hard time in mathematics, but not in reading. The research has been published in the ‘Educational Review Journal’. Looking at data stretching from 1992 to 2019, the analysis revealed that 10-year-olds in US states with bigger gaps in income did less well in maths than those living in areas of America where earnings were more evenly distributed. With income inequality in the US the highest in the developed world, researcher Professor Joseph Workman argued that addressing social inequality may do more to boost academic achievement than reforming schools or curricula — favoured methods of policymakers. Income inequality — a measure of how unevenly income is distributed through a population — has long been associated with a host of health and social problems including…

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Researchers Explore How Effects Of Childhood Abuse Extend Into Middle Age

Washington [US], January 14 (ANI): Childhood sexual abuse can lead to depression, anxiety, cardiovascular disease and other health problems later in life. However, not all abused children experience these problems, and researchers are working to understand whose health is affected and why. In a new article, published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology, a team of researchers led by faculty in Penn State’s College of Health and Human Development examined how the production of the stress hormone cortisol differs from childhood to middle age for some women who experienced childhood sexual abuse. “Previous research has shown that childhood sexual abuse is related to a lot of health issues that are sustained into adulthood,” said John Felt, postdoctoral fellow in the Center for Healthy Aging. “But we still need to understand how early-life adversity does or does not become embedded in people’s lives. When we understand this,…

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Study: Gender Stereotypes In Computer Science, Engineering Begin By Age Six

Houston [US], January 10 (ANI): A new study has found that the perception that boys are more interested than girls in computer science and engineering starts as young as age six. The research has been published in the ‘Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Journal’. That may be one reason why girls and women are underrepresented in these STEM career fields, reported study co-author Allison Master, assistant professor at the University Of Houston College Of Education. “Gender-interest stereotypes that say ‘STEM is for boys’ begin in grade school, and by the time they reach high school, many girls have made their decision not to pursue degrees in computer science and engineering because they feel they don’t belong,” said Master. Researchers at UH and the University of Washington surveyed nearly 2,500 students in first through 12th grade from diverse racial and socioeconomic backgrounds. The…

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Study: Parent’s Genes Can Influence A Child’s Educational Success

London [UK], January 10 (ANI): According to new research by the University College London, a child’s educational success depends on the genes of his parents that have been inherited as well as not been inherited. The study has been published in ‘The American Journal of Human Genetics’. Funded by the Nuffield Foundation, the study confirmed that genes a person inherits directly are most likely to contribute to their achievements in education. But parent genes that aren’t directly inherited, yet have still shaped parents’ own education levels and subsequently influenced the lifestyle and family environment they provide for their children, are also important and can affect how well a person does at school and beyond. Children resemble their parents because of nature (the genes they inherit) and nurture (the environment they grow up in). But nature and nurture effects are intertwined. Mothers and fathers each…

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Study Finds Indulging In Sports Is Good For Boys

A new study has found that boys who participate in sports in early childhood are less likely to experience later depressive and anxiety symptoms — known as emotional distress — in middle childhood. The research has been published in the ‘Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics’. The study also suggested that boys who experience less emotional distress in middle childhood are also more likely to be more physically active in early adolescence. In the study, “we wanted to clarify the long-term and reciprocal relationship in school-aged children between participation in sports and depressive and anxiety symptoms,” said Marie Josee-Harbec, who did the work as a doctoral student supervised by UdeM psychoeducation professor Linda Pagani. “We also wanted to examine whether this relationship worked differently in boys and girls between the ages of 5 and 12,” said Harbec, who along with Pagani practices at CHU…

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Study: Re-enrolling To Complete Bachelor’s Degree May Increase Annual Income

According to a new study by Kansas State University, returning to college to earn a bachelor’s degree leads to both an immediate increase in annual income after graduation and an increase in annual income growth each year after graduation. The research has been published in the ‘Economics of Education Review Journal’. Amanda Gaulke, assistant professor of economics in the College of Arts and Sciences, found that students who returned to college and finish a bachelor’s degree earn on average USD 4,294 more immediately after graduation and experienced extra income growth of USD 1,121 per year, on average. “No matter how I looked at the data, those who returned and finished a bachelor’s degree see an economically meaningful increase in income after degree completion,” Gaulke said. “The average age at graduation for this sample is 27, so they certainly have a lot of working years…

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Why do we deceive ourselves. Reason is this….

Bochum [Germany], (ANI): A team of researchers from the Ruhr-Universitat Bochum (RUB) and the University of Antwerp examined the role of self-deception in everyday life and the strategies people use to deceive themselves. The study has been published in the ‘Philosophical Psychology Journal’.Dr Francesco Marchi and Professor Albert Newen described four strategies used to stabilise and shield the positive self-image. According to their theory, self-deception helps people to stay motivated in difficult situations. “All people deceive themselves, and quite frequently at that,” said Albert Newen from the RUB Institute of Philosophy II. “For instance, if a father is convinced that his son is a good student and then the son brings home bad grades, he may first say that the subject isn’t that important or that the teacher didn’t explain the material well,” he added. The researchers called this strategy of self-deception the reorganisation…

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The more we trust, quicker we recover from covid

Exeter [UK], (ANI): According to a new study, countries, where people have more trust in each other, have been more successful in bringing down waves of coronavirus cases and deaths. The research has been published in the ‘Scientific Reports Journal’.Researchers found there is a “threshold effect” in nations where at least 40 per cent of people agree “most people can be trusted”. This supported an effective reduction of cases and deaths during 2020. Previous studies showed levels of trust in the UK are at the critical 40 per cent compared to more than 60 per cent in Scandinavian countries. China also has high levels of trust within society. Analysing coronavirus data during 2020 the researchers found more trusting societies tended to achieve a faster decline in infections and deaths from peak levels. This is likely because behaviours vital to stopping the spread of COVID-19,…

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Study: Women Who Are Sports Fans Don’t Necessarily Attend More Games

A new study has found that even American women who identify as being quite passionate sports fans don’t watch athletic events much more frequently than women who say they aren’t as interested. Overall, results of a survey of more than 2,800 women suggested that the average woman rates herself as a moderate sports fan, with 87 per cent saying they watched or followed one or more sports over the past year, and 38 per cent attending one or more sporting events. The study was published recently in the journal ‘International Review for the Sociology of Sport’. The findings highlight that while many women enjoy sports, their passion may not always be evident in terms of watching and attending sports events, said Frances Sutton, lead author of the study and a doctoral student in anthropology at The Ohio State University. “We can’t assume that women…

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Study Finds Children Are More Comfortable Confronting Peers

A recent study led by an international team of researchers has found that children globally will challenge peers if they break the ‘rules’, but how they challenge them varies between cultures. The study has been published in the ‘Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Journal’. Led by the University of Plymouth, UK and Freie Universitat Berlin, Germany, the study analysed the behaviour of 376 children aged five to eight from eight societies in Africa, Asia, Europe, and South America. The children were each taught to play a block sorting game – with half taught to sort the blocks by colour, and half taught to sort them by shape. They were then put into pairs, with one playing the game and the other observing. The research showed that observers intervened more often when the other child appeared to play by the wrong set of…

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Studies Suggest Measures To Help Children Of Mothers With Depression

New studies among Syrian refugee families in Turkey and families with infants in Sweden and Bhutan have found that children of mothers in poor mental health risk falling behind in their cognitive development. However, very small changes may be sufficient to break this correlation. Having plenty of people around them and an available community are two of the most important factors for helping children, in all three countries. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Developmental Science’. “If you improve the mental health of mothers by four per cent, the child wins an entire year in their cognitive development, in statistical terms. Small measures, in other words, can make a big difference in supporting the next generation,” said Gustaf Gredeback, Professor of Developmental Psychology at Uppsala University and Director of the Uppsala Child and Baby Lab, which led the studies. The…

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Study: Entrepreneurs Have Different Behavioural Traits & Operate With Different Levels Of Trust

According to a study, entrepreneurs have different behavioural traits and operate with different levels of trust. The research has been published in the ‘Journal of Business Venturing’. The researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore found that entrepreneurs, whom they define as individuals who start new businesses, build trust more quickly with others in work-related situations. Entrepreneurs were found to be more sensitive and quick to react to dishonesty during a simulated business transaction. For example, entrepreneurs would be quicker to withdraw from a deal upon sensing that a potential business partner is not reciprocating, said the researchers. Previous research on the psychology of entrepreneurs hypothesised that they had different character traits from the rest of the population and aimed to discover how those qualities made some individuals more inclined to start new ventures, while others did not. The NTU researchers said that the results…

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Study: Hospitalisation Of Children Impacts School, Parent’s Work

A new study has found that children with critical illness in intensive care miss days to weeks of school while their parents miss work to be with them. The research has been published in the ‘JAMA Open Network Journal’. Two in three children in a study cohort of young patients requiring ICU care for critical illness missed school during the six months after discharge- with absences averaging two weeks but sometimes longer. Meanwhile, half of the primary caregivers missed work during the same period. “Pediatric critical illness impacts a family’s health and well-being not only during the child’s treatment but after they leave the hospital and go home,” said lead author Erin Carlton, M.D., a pediatric intensivist at University of Michigan Health C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. “We know that missing that much school puts children at risk of worse academic achievements and other poor…

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Study: Shaming Kids Effective Or Not? Depends On Parents’ Religiosity Level

According to research at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, a child’s response to a stern environment in the house can depend on the religious belief of the parent. The study has been published in the ‘Child Development Journal’. Studies led by Professor Maayan Davidov at HU’s Paul Baerwald School of Social Work and Social Welfare showed that a child’s response to such stern discipline can depend on the religious commitment of the parent. Her research, in collaboration with Maya Oren-Gabai and Dr Islam Abu-Asaad, assessed the social behaviour of children aged between 6 and 12 years old in 300+ secular and religious Israeli Jewish and Muslim families. The results showed that in secular Jewish families, mothers’ use of psychological control did appear to have a negative effect on their kids, making them less likely to help others. However, in religious Jewish families, there was…

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Study: Storybooks Early Source Of Gender Stereotypes For Children

According to a study, by the age of two, children start developing beliefs about gender, including stereotypes that boys are better at mathematics and girls at reading. The research has been published in the ‘Psychological Science Journal’. However, a new study examined a different, potentially under-recognised source of gender stereotypes and associations: popular children’s books. Researchers found that storybooks contain many words that adults considered to be gendered and likely contribute to children’s gender knowledge. “We found that many popular children’s books often read to young children, like Curious George and Amelia Bedelia, contain rich information about gender that is presented in subtle ways,” said Molly Lewis, a researcher with the Department of Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University and lead author of the study. “In some cases, the stereotypes in these books were stronger than in books targeted at adults,” she added. Previous research…

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Need Help At Work? Study Suggest Asking In-Person Over Emailing, Texting

According to a new study by Cornell University, if you need help at work, asking in person for help maximizes one’s chance of getting a “yes”, rather than emailing or texting. The research has been published in the ‘Social Psychological and Personality Science Journal’. The article was co-authored by Vanessa Bohns, associate professor in Cornell’s Industrial and Labor Relations School, and M. Mahdi Roghanizad, assistant professor at Ryerson University. “If you really need a ‘yes,’ it’s best to ask in person,” Bohns said. The researchers conducted experiments with 490 people and 1,490 respondents to their requests for help proofreading a half-page of text. In one exercise, help-seekers asked five friends over varied channels to see which ones elicited the most compliance with requests. Those findings were compared with what help-seekers predicted would be the most effective channels. The results did not mesh. Most people…

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Study: School Uniforms Don’t Have Any Effect On Student Behaviour

A new national study has found that despite the belief of many parents and teachers, school uniforms don’t seem to have any effect on young students’ behaviour or attendance overall. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Early Childhood Research Quarterly’. But students who attended schools requiring school uniforms did report lower levels of “school belonging” in fifth grade than did students in schools without uniforms. The findings came from data on more than 6,000 school-age children. “A lot of the core arguments about why school uniforms are good for student behaviour don’t hold up in our sample,” said Arya Ansari, lead author of the study and assistant professor of human sciences at The Ohio State University. “We didn’t see much difference in our behaviour measures, regardless of whether the schools had a uniform policy or not,” Ansari added. Ansari conducted…

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Study: Parents Underestimate Teenagers’ Use Of Social Media During Pandemic

 According to a new study, parents’ and adolescents’ estimates of adolescent social media use during the first year of the pandemic differed significantly. The study has been published in the ‘Academic Pediatrics Journal’. While parents estimated that their children spent more total time using screens recreationally than their kids estimated, parents underestimated the amount of time spent specifically on social media and multi-player video games (versus texting, video chats, and other uses). “Although most parents and their teens spent more time together at home during the pandemic, this did not translate to a greater awareness of their child’s screen use,” said lead author Jason Nagata, MD, assistant professor of paediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco. The study also found that parents underestimated girls’ more than boys’ social media use. Research suggested that social media can have a detrimental impact on teenage girls’…

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Extensive Use Of Smartphones By Parents Might Damage Toddler’s Development

 A new study has found that interaction between mothers and their toddlers is reduced by a factor of four when the mothers use their smartphones and this might damage their toddler’s development as well. The research has been published in the ‘Child Development Journal’. The new study was led by Dr Katy Borodkin of the Department of Communication Disorders at the Stanley Steyer School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine of Tel Aviv University. The experiment involved dozens of mothers of toddlers (aged two to three years). The mothers were ostensibly invited to participate in a study examining the link between the mother’s and the child’s interests, and so they were asked to perform three tasks: Browse a designated Facebook page and like videos and articles that interested them; read printed magazines and mark articles that interested them; and finally, play with the…

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Study: Personality Traits Predict Performance Differently Across Different Jobs

A study has found that whether your personality traits affect your job performance, depends on the job you have. The research has been published in the ‘Journal of Vocational Behaviour’. “Although past studies made statements about the effects of personality traits on job performance in general, the specifics of these relationships really depend on the job,” said Michael Wilmot, assistant professor of management in the Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas. “More interesting findings exist when we take a deeper look at performance within the different jobs,” he added. Wilmot and Deniz Ones, professor of psychology at the University of Minnesota, combined multiple meta-analyses of the five big personality traits — conscientiousness, extraversion, openness, agreeableness and neuroticism — and examined their effect on job performance. Meta-analysis is a process used to systematically merge multiple independent findings using statistical methods…

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Tips To Let Go Of Your Toxic Relationship

We have all heard stories of it, read books about it, seen it in movies, but when it comes to spotting and ending a toxic relationship in real life, it’s no cakewalk. Dr Lillian Glass, a California-based communication and psychology expert, defines a toxic relationship in her 1995 book Toxic People as “any relationship [between people who] don’t support each other, where there’s conflict and one seeks to undermine the other, where there’s competition, where there’s disrespect and a lack of cohesiveness.”. For a relationship to be classified as being “toxic”, it needs to make a person feel unloved, unsupported, feel trapped, controlled, misunderstood, subject of constant ridicule or made to feel small. Doubting yourself, making yourself believe that you deserve the trauma and blaming yourself for letting it happen are all signs of being in a toxic relationship. Don’t fret, you are not…

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Study Investigate Whether Personality Traits Can Be Improved Without Personal Motivation

A new study has found that attempting to improve someone’s emotional stability without their commitment is not likely to happen. The research has been published in the ‘Journal of Research in Personality’. A growing body of studies suggested that personality traits can be changed through intervention. As a recent study conducted by SMU psychology professor Nathan Hudson noted, personality traits are linked to a wide range of life outcomes, such as relationship quality and occupation success. The goal of his recent research was to test two theories; that successful personality intervention may require that the participants choose which traits they change and that they be actively invested in changing the target traits. He found that conscientiousness – the ability to be responsible, hard-working and organized – could be improved even if participants were not motivated to change. Completing a series of tasks over a…

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Study: Self Perception Becomes Blurrier Over Time

When you look at two objects close to you such as two leaves, it’s easy to tell them apart but when they are farther away from you, they become difficult to distinguish. The two objects become “compressed,” a basic principle of perception. One’s concept of self, works the same way, according to a recent study. The findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. If someone asks you, for example, if you think you’ll be calmer tomorrow than today, it’s easy to compare the two. But if you’re asked if you think you’ll be calmer in 10 versus 11 days, it becomes much more difficult to discriminate between the two days. “Our self-concept becomes increasingly blurrier over time, the farther you get from the present,” said senior-author Meghan Meyer, an assistant professor of psychological and brain sciences. “As you…

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Study: Working Abroad May Hamper Your Partner’s Career

According to a study for a doctoral dissertation, organisations should pay much more attention to the situation of the partners of their international employees. The research was presented by Kaisu Kanstren at the University of Vaasa in Finland. Kaisu Kanstren’s doctoral dissertation examined the career identities, career capital development and subjective well-being of expatriate partners. For her dissertation, Kanstren interviewed thirty Finnish career-oriented expatriate partners. “Although the comfort of partners is very important for the success of international assignments and recruitments in general, companies and organisations still do not pay sufficient attention to the situation of relocating partners,” said Kanstren. The results of the study showed that global mobility had a significant impact on the career identity of expatriate partners. In the worst-case scenario, moving abroad for the sake of a partner’s work could lead to the loss of the career identity of the…

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Study: Speaking ‘Baby Talk’ To Infants May Help Them Learn To Produce Speech

According to a recent study, when parents baby talk with their infants, they may be helping them learn to produce speech. The research has been published in the ‘Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research’. The way we instinctively speak to babies — higher pitch, slower speed, exaggerated pronunciation — not only appeals to them but likely helps them learn to understand what we’re saying. New research from the University of Florida suggested that baby talk can have another, previously unknown benefit: helping babies learn to produce their own speech. By mimicking the sound of a smaller vocal tract, the researchers think, we’re cluing babies into how the words should sound coming out of their own mouths. “It seems to stimulate motor production of speech, not just the perception of speech,” said Matthew Masapollo, PhD, an assistant professor in UF’s Department of Speech, Language,…

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Study Finds Ways To Help Children Learn Forgiveness

Researchers have found that teaching children to understand other people’s perspectives could make it easier for them to learn how to forgive others. The study also found that teaching children to make sincere apologies can help them receive forgiveness from others. The findings of the study were published in the ‘Journal of Experimental Psychology’. “Forgiveness is important in children and adults for restoring relationships and limiting future conflicts,” said Kelly Lynn Mulvey, lead author of the study and an associate professor of psychology at North Carolina State University. “But we didn’t know much about what makes children more likely to forgive others, particularly from early childhood to adolescence. That’s what we wanted to explore with our study,” added Mulvey. To that end, Mulvey and her collaborators enlisted 185 children, between the ages of 5 and 14, in the study. Researchers conducted an in-depth interview…

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Study: Parents Can Influence Children’s Study Options

If one of your parents has studied STEM (science, technology, engineering or math) there is a high chance that you will too choose one of these options for graduation, according to a study. The research has been published in the ‘Social Science Research Journal’. Sociology researchers — second-year doctoral student Ned Tilbrook and associate professor Dara Shifrer — found that students whose parents had a bachelor’s degree in STEM are not only more likely to choose and persist in a STEM major than students whose parents had no bachelor’s degree, but they are also significantly more likely to choose and persist in a STEM major than students whose parents had graduated with a degree in some other field. Tilbrook and Shrifer call this STEM-specific cultural capital. They suggested that parents passed it on to their children through a variety of ways: engaging in activities…

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Study Finds During The Covid-19 Pandemic, How Stress Affected Parents’ Discipline

 A study has found that during the COVID-19 pandemic, parents were most likely to use aggressive discipline on their children when their daily stress levels were at the highest. The research has been published in the ‘Journal of Family Violence’. Results of the study, which measured stress levels three times a day for two weeks, showed that for each higher level of stress (rated from 1-10), parents had 1.3 times greater odds of using corporal punishment, such as shaking or spanking a child, or psychological aggression, such as trying to make the child feel ashamed. “It wasn’t overall levels of stress that mattered most,” said Bridget Freisthler, lead author of the study and professor of social work at The Ohio State University. “It appears that general levels of stress are less important to how parents discipline their children than the stress they are feeling…

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Study: Personality Might Have A Big Impact On Financial Decision Making & Risk-Taking

According to new research by the University of Georgia, your personality might have a big impact on financial decision making and risk-taking. The findings of the research have been published in the ‘Personality and Individual Differences Journal’. In the new study, psychology PhD student Jim Exley investigated the “Big Five” personality traits: openness, conscientiousness, extroversion, agreeableness and neuroticism (OCEAN). He and a team of researchers identified three distinct combinations of traits with financial outcomes, specifying Resilient, Over Controlled and Under Controlled personality profiles that are associated with risk-taking and money management behaviours. “Based on our results, the people with the best financial outcomes tend to be those who are well-adjusted, more extroverted and less neurotic,” said Exley. “They’re also willing to take some risks, but they don’t take too many,” he added. Exley was drawn to this research after working in the financial services…

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Study: How You Speak Up At Work Has Effect On How Teams Come Together

Suggesting a creative idea or a more efficient way to work can help companies overcome challenges and meet goals. New research shows more subtle and often overlooked form of speaking up has a big effect on the way work gets done and how teams come together. “What we say within a group, the ideas we suggest and the way we support others signals something about who we are to our coworkers. It can attract people to us or repel them,” said Melissa Chamberlin, assistant professor of management and entrepreneurship at Iowa State University, and co-author of a paper recently published in the Journal of Management. In the paper, Chamberlin and her research team demonstrate how two different ways of communicating work-related issues shape reputations and affect the formation of teams to complete short-term projects. They found people who use a “supportive voice,” which fuels…

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Relationship Between Parent-Teacher Important For Home Schooling During Lockdown

The importance of the relationship between parents and teachers during the lockdown to provide academic assistance to the students as well as practical and emotional support has been emphasised upon in a recent study. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Educational Review’. With schools closed from March 2020 until the end of the academic year and again from January 2021, pupils were taught online. This put an expectation on parents to shoulder some of the responsibility in ensuring pupils were engaged in their learning and to try and minimise some of the disadvantages faced by pupils from lower-income families who may not have had access to the same learning equipment or facilities as others. Academics from Anglia Ruskin University (ARU) led a team of researchers who surveyed 271 primary school teachers from across the country during June and July 2000…

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Autonomy Can Lead To Better Entrepreneurial Team Performance

Researchers have recently suggested that autonomy can lead to better entrepreneurial team performance, but there are different types of autonomy. The study has been published in the ‘Organization Science Journal’. Viktoria Boss and Christoph Ihl, both from the Hamburg University of Technology, and Linus Dahlander and Rajshri Jayaraman, both from ESMT, investigated how two types of autonomy affected the performance of entrepreneurial teams: choosing project ideas to work on and choosing team members to work with. The researchers ran a field experiment involving 939 students on a start-up entrepreneurship course in which students were organized into teams to develop and pitch business ideas. Individuals were assigned to one of four scenarios: 1) choosing their team members and idea, 2) choosing their team members, 3) choosing their idea, or 4) choosing neither their team nor idea. In teams, students developed an entrepreneurial pitch deck, a…

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Parental Stress Is A Factor Linking Maternal Depression, Child Anxiety & Depressive Symptoms

A new study has found a bi-directional relationship where a mother’s mental health symptoms impacted the child’s mental health symptoms and vice versa. According to researchers with Cizik School of Nursing at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston), a secondary analysis of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (Fragile Families) found a bi-directional relationship where a mother’s mental health symptoms impacted the child’s mental health symptoms and vice versa. The analysis, published in the print edition of the ‘Journal of Affective Disorders’, investigated mother and child mental health symptoms over a 10-year period to provide new insights into the development of depression and anxiety among families. The research points to parental stress, or the processes and subsequent reactions that result from attempting to manage the challenges and burdens of parenthood, as the factor that partially links maternal depression…

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Signs That Your Friendship Is Toxic

They tease, they gossip, and they backstab. It’s hard to recognize or realize unhealthy friendships and it’s harder to let them go. It’s important that you don’t ignore red flags in your friendship. Here are a few signs that your friendship is toxic. 1: It’s not easy when someone you think of as a best friend won’t appreciate your work. If they don’t appreciate you now, they probably won’t appreciate you later.  2: They don’t support your dreams and goals, but they love to see you fail—which is why we need to put a stop to them once and for all. 3: Your “friend” doesn’t spend time with you but you see them hanging out with other people all the time. They don’t make an effort to meet you. 4: They call you only when they want to. They aren’t there to quench your…

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Study: Parental Depression Is Associated With Worse Childhood Mental Health

According to a new study, children who live with a parent who has depression are more likely to develop depression and do not achieve educational milestones. The findings of the study were published in the open-access journal ‘PLOS ONE’. Maternal depression is a known risk factor for depression in children and is associated with a range of adverse child health and educational outcomes including poorer academic attainment. To date, however, risk factors associated with paternal depression have been less well examined. Understanding the effects of timing of both maternal and paternal depression of offspring outcomes has implications for prevention and early intervention. In the new study, Brophy and colleagues used data from the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) databank assembled as part of the Born in Wales Study funded by the Welsh Government. Information on children born in Wales from 1987 to 2018, as…

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Study: Talking To Kids While Watching Tv Increases Their Curiosity Levels

Increased television watching is associated with poorer development in your younger ones. However, according to a new study, talking to your kids while watching TV is a new way to counter its negative effects. The findings of the study were published in the ‘PLOS ONE Journal’ The more parents engaged in conversation with preschoolers during shared TV time, the more likely those children were to have higher curiosity levels when they reached kindergarten, the new study suggested. This was particularly true for children with socioeconomic disadvantages. “Our findings reinforce the importance of parent conversation to promote early childhood development and curiosity, especially for children from under-resourced families,” said lead author Prachi Shah, M.D. M.S., a developmental and behavioural paediatrician at University of Michigan Health C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. “We know that more frequent parent-child conversation is promotive of several areas of early child development,…

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Study: Giving Support To Family & Friends As Important As Receiving, Boosts Health

According to new research, the willingness to give social support to your family and friends is as important as receiving assistance as it’s good for your health. The study was published in the ‘Brain, Behavior and Immunity Journal’. While researchers have long thought that receiving social support from others is a key to health, results from studies have shown mixed results. So, the researchers from the Ohio State University decided to see if giving support may also play an important role in health. They found that on one important measure of health — chronic inflammation — indicators of positive social relationships were associated with lower inflammation only among people who said they were available to provide social support to family and friends. In other words, having friends to lean on may not help your health unless you also said that you’re available to help…

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Study: Games Might Reflect Aspects Of Human Cultures

Humans all over the world play games, but games are not played equally throughout the world’s cultures. Humans might use games to store and teach cultural-specific information to community members. For example, if you think of the last game that you played, was it a cooperative game, a competitive game, or a game that you played by yourself? “If you live in Germany, chances are high that you played a competitive game,” says Sarah Leisterer-Peoples, a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig. Sarah added, “We think that games might reflect aspects of human cultures, such as how competitive and cooperative the cultures are.” Previous research suggests that in socially hierarchical cultures, or those with differences in status and wealth, competitive games are played frequently. And the opposite has also been suggested–in egalitarian cultures, or those with little or no…

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How To Save Yourself From Being Love-Bombed

Over-the-top displays of affection, romantic gifts, constant compliments, hours of ‘our future together’ talks in a new relationship might make you feel on top of the world. But are these gestures authentic or do they originate from something sinister? It could very much be that you have been love-bombed. “Love bombing is when things are too much too soon. When someone is being too intense way too soon, there is a hidden agenda to this avalanche of love and care. When their love and attention seems too good to be true. It probably is. There is no such thing as a perfect relationship. But when someone gives you the idea that it’s perfect. It is because they want you to see that it is,” says Sheelaa M Bajaj, life coach facilitator. In the beginning, it all seems perfect, but soon it turns to abuse.…

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How Active Listening Helps You Build Relationships

In our everyday lives we might hear people, but how often do we intently listen? Listening can be deeply therapeutic and magical. There’s a concept called Active Listening, which can help you build relationships and connect well with people. Well, it’s time we kick aside these shallow talks. Let active listening take you deeper into people’s worlds and form meaningful relationships. This is how you can practise it. Be Present And Attentive Keep aside your phone, bring your mind to the present and be attentive. When you’re fully engaged in a conversation, you offer respect to the one talking. Unfortunately, with our busy schedules and busier mind, this isn’t very common. Being in the present can encourage an honest bond between you and them, where they feel safe and acknowledged.Be Non-Judgemental Every preconceived notion, every judgment, it’s time to keep it all aside. When…

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Signs You’re In A Forced Relationship

Relationships can test you at times. Be it distance or routine, you have to put in effort for it to work and make your relationship more exciting every day. Putting effort into your relationship is never a bad thing, but when it seems like you are giving more than your partner, you can sense a problem. A relationship is a two-way street and it should be fair to both of the people in it. Here are 5 signs which can help you find out if yours is a “forced” relationship. They Don’t Ask You About Your Day While you keenly ask your partner about their day and how it was, they don’t ask you about yours. When you are in a healthy relationship, you are interested in knowing what is going on in each other’s life. If you feel that this conversation is one-sided,…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study: Well-Being Programmes Can Improve The Quality Of Work Relationships

According to a new study, participation in workplace health and welfare programmes can improve the quality of work relationships and reduce bullying. The findings of the research have been published in the ‘British Journal of Management’. Researchers from the University of East Anglia (UEA), working in collaboration with insurance and investments company Vitality, found that the more employees engage with health and wellbeing programmes (HWPs) the better the quality of co-worker relationships, the less they experience bullying over time, and the better their longer-term wellbeing and job satisfaction. Unexpectedly, the results suggested that even when senior managers are not committed to these initiatives, employee engagement with HWPs is associated with better relationships at work and the same subsequent positive benefits. The researchers said the findings are particularly relevant given the new patterns of working which have emerged as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study Finds Ways To Make Waiting Less Arduous For Toddlers

When toddlers have to wait, it is often difficult for them, as they can’t yet regulate their emotions. A new study has found that left to their own devices, children prefer activities that correspond to their temperament. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Child Development’. Toddlers were able to learn to distract themselves by observing a stranger and generalising the observed behaviour. When their mother wants to finish typing an email or their father is on the phone, toddlers can get restless very quickly: at this age, waiting is not something they are good at. How can parents teach their children to cope better with such waiting situations? This question was the starting point for the study that involved 96 toddlers aged two and their parents. A previous study had shown that children can learn through observation to distract themselves…

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Study: The Way People Laugh Can Reveal Their Cultural Group

Can we infer someone’s cultural group from their laugher? A new study by researchers from the University of Amsterdam with international colleagues shows that our laughter gives us away. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Philosophical Transactions B’. The study included Dutch and Japanese producers of laughter and listeners. Listeners could detect whether a laughing person is from their own or another cultural group by only hearing a brief laughter segment. Spontaneous laughter was rated as most positive by both groups. Laughter is a strong nonverbal vocalisation, which is frequently used to signal affiliation, reward, or cooperative intent, and often helps to maintain and strengthen social bonds. An important distinction is between spontaneous and voluntary laughter. Spontaneous laughter is typically an uncontrolled reaction, for instance to hilarious jokes, and includes hard-to-fake acoustic features. Voluntary laughter is produced by purposefully modulating…

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Students Who Repeat Grade Experience More Bullying: Study

According to a new study of nearly half a million subjects, students who have repeated a grade have higher risks of being victims of bullying in countries around the world. The study was published in the journal PLOS Medicine by Xiayun Zuo of Fudan University, China. It was a part of the PLOS Medicine Special Issue on Global Child Health. Addressing and preventing school violence, including bullying, is a specific target of the United National Sustainable Development Goals. Few studies involving large samples have examined the association between grade repetition and bullying victimization. In the new study, researchers used data from the Program for International Student Assessment (PIA) 2018, which included information on 465,146 students aged 15 and 16 from 74 countries/economies. Overall, 12.25 per cent of included students had repeated a grade and 30.32 per cent of students reported having experienced bullying at…

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Study: Best Way To Avoid Procrastination

New research from the University of Otago has found that no deadline or shorter deadlines work better to avoid procrastinating a task. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Economic Inquiry’. Professor Stephen Knowles, from the Otago Business School, Department of Economics, and his co-authors tested the effect of deadline length on task completion. Participants were invited to complete an online survey in which a donation goes to charity. They were given either one week, one month, or no deadline to respond. Professor Knowles said the research began because he and his team — Dr Murat Genc, from Otago’s Department of Economics, Dr Trudy Sullivan, from Otago’s Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, and Professor Maros Servatka, from the Macquarie Graduate School of Management — were interested in helping charities raise more money. However, the results are applicable to any situation…

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Study: Strategies To Help ‘Picky Eaters’ Deal With Food Aversions

In a new study, adults who struggled with picky eating habits as children said they benefitted more from positive and encouraging strategies their parents used than forceful or coercive approaches. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘International Journal of Eating Disorders’. The research, led by a team at Duke Health, was conducted among a generation of people who struggled with food avoidance before it was identified in 2013 as a psychiatric condition called Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID). The researchers said their findings provide guidance for both families and behavioural health professionals for developing best practices to deal with extreme food aversions. When picky eating is severe, it is diagnosed as ARFID. The condition is characterised by health problems such as weight loss and nutritional deficiencies and it can also lead to social and emotional problems when mealtimes become a…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study: Common Household Noises May Be Stressing Your Dog

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have found that people may not recognize that their dog is stressed when exposed to common household noises. The study was published in the journal Frontiers in Veterinary Science. While it’s well-established that sudden loud noises, such as fireworks or thunderstorms, commonly trigger a dog’s anxiety, a new study finds even common noises, such as a vacuum or microwave can be a trigger. The research found that high-frequency, intermittent noises such as the battery warning of a smoke detector are more likely to cause dog anxiety, rather than low-frequency, continuous noise. “We know that there are a lot of dogs that have noise sensitivities, but we underestimate their fearfulness to noise we consider normal because many dog owners can’t read body language,” said lead author Emma Grigg, a research associate and lecturer at the UC Davis School…

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Study: Pandemic Solitude Was Positive Experience For Many

According to a new research, time spent alone during the coronavirus pandemic led to positive effects on well-being across all ages. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Frontiers in Psychology’. The study of more than 2000 teenagers and adults found that most people experienced benefits from solitude during the early days of the global COVID-19 pandemic. All age groups experienced positive as well as negative effects of being alone. However, the researchers found that descriptions of solitude included more positive effects than negative. On average, well-being scores when participants were alone were 5 out of 7 across all ages, including adolescents aged 13-16. Some study participants talked about worsening mood or wellbeing, but most described their experiences of solitude in terms of feeling, competent and feeling autonomous. 43 per cent of all respondents mentioned that solitude involved activities and experiences…

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Study: Nurses As Parents Exemplify Link Between Poor Sleep, Daily Stress

Research has revealed that nurses who also are parents might be more susceptible than other groups to daily stress aggravated by poor sleep. The consequences of the sleep-stressor link in nurses with children may affect their caregiving at home and on the job, where nurses represent the largest population of front-line health care workers. The findings of the study were published in the ‘Journal of Sleep Research’. “We were really interested in looking at how the sleep-stressor relationship is different for nurses who are parents and nurses who are not parents,” said lead author Taylor Harris, a doctoral student in counselling psychology at the University of Kansas. “We also wanted to look at how many children parents have further influences the relationship between sleep and stress in those working parents because caregiving at work and at home can be particularly difficult — sometimes we…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study: Women Are More Reluctant Than Men To Ask For Deadline Extensions

A new research has found that women are less likely than men to ask for more time to complete projects with adjustable deadlines at work or school. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences’. Compared to men, women were more concerned that they would be burdening others by asking for an extension, and that they would be seen as incompetent, the study showed. Prior research has shown that women feel more time stress than men do, and feeling uncomfortable about asking for more time to complete projects may be one important reason why, said Grant Donnelly, co-author of the study and assistant professor of marketing at The Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business. “Women understandably feel like they have too many things to do and not enough time to do them. We found…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study: Men Experience More Emotional Pain During Breakups

The findings of a new study of online relationship support suggest that men tend to experience emotional pain more than women when their relationship takes a turn for the worse. The study and its results have been published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. An international team of psychologists led by researchers at Lancaster University conducted the first-ever “big data” analysis of relationship problems. The study began as an attempt to create a map of the most common relationship problems experienced by people outside of clinical and counselling settings. “Most of what we know about relationship problems comes from studies of people in couples therapy, which includes a rather specific subset of people — people who have the time, money, and motive to work on their relationship problems,” said Charlotte Entwistle, lead author of the study. “We wanted to understand not only…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study: Joining Social Media Before Age 11 Related To Problematic Digital Behaviour

A new study has suggested that using Instagram or Snapchat before age 11 is significantly related to more problematic digital behaviours, compared to those who joined these platforms when they were older. The study published in Computers in Human Behavior also found that parental restrictions on phone use and checking social media ameliorated some of the negative effects. “Social media sites all require a minimum age of 13 to register, but the reality is that many users are younger than that: one-third of our sample had already started using social media at age 11 or 12 and another one-third had begun at age 10 or younger,” said the study’s lead author Linda Charmaraman, PhD, director of the Youth, Media and Wellbeing Research Lab at the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW). “This study helps us understand the risks and benefits for kids and tweens so…

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Study Finds How Young Adults Cope With Missing Out During Covid-19 Pandemic

A new study of college students’ experiences with loss during the COVID-19 pandemic has shown that although few directly experienced a close death, everyone lost something that left an impact on their lives. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Death Studies’. Researchers collected the stories as part of class assignments where students reflected on their earliest and most significant losses regarding COVID-19. Although grieving deaths were mentioned by several participants, most talked about what are often referred to as “shadow losses,” said Raven Weaver, assistant professor in Washington State University’s Department of Human Development. The term ‘shadow loss,’ coined by thanatologist Cole Imperi, reflects losses in life, not of life. Those types of losses include losing social experiences, like going to football games or parties, not seeing family or friends in person or bigger events like having a wedding cancelled.…

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Study: Poor Parents Who Receive Universal Payments Spend More On Kids

When given cash with no strings attached, low and middle-income parents increased their spending on their children, according to Washington State University research. The study, published in the journal ‘Social Forces’, also found that the additional funding had little impact on child-related expenditures of high-income parents. For the study, WSU sociologist Mariana Amorim analyzed spending by recipients of the Alaska Permanent Fund payments. Funded by state oil revenues, the fund is the closest program in the United States to a universal basic income. Every resident in Alaska receives a payment called a dividend; the total amount varies each year, but during the time span of this study, 1996-2015, payments averaged around USD 1,812 a person, or USD 7,248 for a four-person family, when adjusted for inflation to 2014 dollars. Amorim found that after the lump sum payments, low- and middle-income parents made more education,…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study: Women Are Not More Emotional Than Men

Contrary to widely held gender stereotypes, women are not more emotional than men, according to researchers at the University of Michigan. Feelings such as enthusiasm, nervousness, or strength are often interpreted differently between the two genders. It’s what being “emotional” means to men vs. women that is part of a new University of Michigan study that dispels these biases. For instance, a man whose emotions fluctuate during a sporting event is described as “passionate.” But a woman whose emotions change due to any event, even if provoked, is considered “irrational,” says the study’s senior author Adriene Beltz, U-M assistant professor of psychology. Beltz and colleagues Alexander Weigard, U-M assistant professor of psychiatry, and Amy Loviska, a graduate student at Purdue University, followed 142 men and women over 75 days to learn more about their daily emotions, both positive and negative. The women were divided…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study Finds How Social Media Changes Way People Get To Know Each Another

According to a new book by a Penn State researcher, social media has the ability to connect people with almost anyone in the world; however it can also change the way brains form new social relationships, maintain current ones, and participate in social groups. The book, ‘Social Media Communication: Trends and Theories’, written by Bu Zhong, associate professor of communications at Penn State, explores how social media affects information processing, the media industry, and business marketing, as well as interpersonal and group communication. Zhong said he wanted to write the book not to examine specific platforms like Facebook and TikTok, but to analyse how social media as a whole affects the human mind and behaviour, as well as business and industry. “The popularity of social media, to many, might be plausibly attributed to the influx of new media technologies,” Zhong said. “The vital driving…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Karva Chauth 2021: Couples Breaking Stereotypes By Breaking Fast Together

Close your eyes and think of Karva Chauth. What comes to mind? Perhaps a woman, dressed in a glittering red saree, holding a chhanni (sieve) in her hand, facing her husband. Traditionally on this one-day festival, married women do not consume any food or water from sunrise to moonrise, to increase the longevity of their husbands’ life. With changing times, many men have decided to reciprocate this expression of love, by partaking in the fasting ritual. So this Karva Chauth 2021, without stealing much light from the patient and determined women, here’s a small ode to men who observe the Karva Chauth fast for their better halves. Married for the past 14 years, Gaurav Malhotra, 39, has been fasting on Karva Chauth for the past few years and is planning to do so this time as well. However, he avoids disclosing this to his…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study Finds How Retirement Impacts Social Support & Wellbeing

New research shows that Australian couples moving into retirement tend to maintain their social networks, and many see an improvement in their mental health and wellbeing. High levels of social connectedness are linked with better health and wellbeing, so this is good news for those with strong social ties. However, for those with low levels of support, it suggests that policies and programs to increase support in retirement could improve wellbeing. The World Health Organisation says social isolation and loneliness have a serious impact on older people’s physical and mental health, quality of life and longevity, compared to other well-established risk factors such as smoking, obesity and physical inactivity. “For some people, social support might decrease when they retire, as they lose work connections or move home, while for others retirement brings more opportunities to strengthen ties or make new friends,” says co-author UTS…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study Finds Role Of Motivation For Healthy Aging

Motivation science investigates what it is that people desire and dislike or even fear, how these desires, dislikes, and fears are transformed into goals, how people go about pursuing these goals successfully or disengage from them if necessary, and how these processes change over time. “Motivation is the royal road to understanding healthy aging,” said a recent supplemental issue to The Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences. The supplement is comprised of nine articles addressing one or more components of a motivational model of healthy aging by reviewing the pertinent research and highlighting open research questions aiming to advance the field of motivation and healthy aging. The supplement was funded by the Swiss foundation Velux Stiftung. In June 2018, the foundation organized the first interdisciplinary workshop in Zurich in order to shed light on the role of motivation for healthy…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study: Disney Animated Movies Helps With Child Development

According to a study by the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work, Disney animated movies can serve as valuable tools for parents and counsellors alike to improve communication with children about tough issues. Disney films, for example, combine entertainment with life lessons about love, friendship, good versus evil, death and loss, and the importance of family. Talking about these important issues together can strengthen a child’s cognitive and behavioural development. These findings were published in the Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal. Researchers analyzed 155 feature-length animated Disney films released between 1937 and 2020 and found the majority do not focus on the entire family unit – 63 per cent did not mention the main character’s biological parents in the story, perhaps leaving some children to wonder why their parents are not there to help. Parents have become notably more visible in…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study: Covid-19 Related Parenting Stress Impacted Eating Habits Of Children

According to a new study by researchers at the University of Houston College of Education, the incredible stress parents experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic had a negative effect on the eating habits of their children. The findings were published in the journal Current Psychology. When stay-at-home mandates were ordered and the school went virtual at the onset of the pandemic, many parents suddenly had to juggle multiple roles such as caregiver, employee and educator. Leslie Frankel, associate professor of human development and family studies, said all those responsibilities took a toll on parents’ mental health, and in turn, what and how much their children were consuming. Previous research has shown that stress, in general, is known to have a negative impact on parent-child feeding interactions, but new findings reveal COVID-19 only magnified the problem. “These parents do not have the time, energy or emotional…

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Study: Adolescents Breakfast Habits Are Affected By Socio-Economic & Gender Inequalities

Breakfast, which is known to be extremely important, especially during periods of growth and learning, such as adolescence because it’s the first meal of the day and hence vital for providing the energy needed to start the school day. Nevertheless, a high percentage of young people, both boys and girls, do not eat breakfast. A recent study carried out by experts from the Faculty of Health Sciences at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) and the Manresa Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Vic – Central University of Catalonia (UVic-UCC) analysed the extent to which adolescents miss breakfast, concluding that 19 per cent of girls and 13 per cent of boys do not eat breakfast. The findings were published in the journal ‘Nutrients’. “Our research has found that adolescents’ breakfast habits are affected by socio-economic and gender inequalities. Furthermore, the risk of…

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Study Finds Size & Scope Of Bullying Kids With Food Allergies

 A new study has determined the size and scope of bullying kids with food allergies experience by offering them a multi-question assessment. The findings of the study were published in the ‘Journal of Pediatric Psychology’. Living with a food allergy can greatly impact a child’s everyday life — from limiting participation in social activities to being treated differently by peers. When asked a simple “yes” or “no” question about food allergy-related bullying, 17 per cent of kids said they’d been bullied, teased or harassed about their food allergy. But when asked to reply to a multi-item list of victimisation behaviours, that number jumped to 31 per cent. Furthermore, Children’s National Hospital researchers found that only 12 per cent of parents reported being aware of it. The reported bullying ranged from verbal teasing or criticism to more overt acts such as an allergen being waved…

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Parental Beliefs & Knowledge May Impact Child Development: Study

A new study has found that children’s brain development can depend on their parents’ knowledge and beliefs. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Nature Communications’. University of Chicago Medicine paediatrician Dana Suskind, MD, along with University of Chicago economists John List, PhD, and Julie Pernaudet, PhD investigated one potential source of discrepancy in child skill level: disparity in parents’ beliefs about their influence over their children’s development. Through experimental studies involving hundreds of families across the Chicagoland area, the researchers show parental knowledge and beliefs differ across socioeconomic status. But these beliefs can, with the right intervention, be changed. Moreover, these changes can have measurable effects on child outcomes. The results may offer policymakers insights into addressing an important contributor to disparities in child skill development. “Neuroscience clearly shows that building early brain connections in children relies on the nurturing…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study: Parental Knowledge & Beliefs May Impact Child Development

A new study has found that parental knowledge and beliefs can impact their children’s brain development. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Nature Communications’. University of Chicago Medicine paediatrician Dana Suskind, MD, along with University of Chicago economists John List, PhD, and Julie Pernaudet, PhD investigated one potential source of discrepancy in child skill level: disparity in parents’ beliefs about their influence over their children’s development. Through experimental studies involving hundreds of families across the Chicagoland area, the researchers show parental knowledge and beliefs differ across socioeconomic status. But these beliefs can, with the right intervention, be changed. Moreover, these changes can have measurable effects on child outcomes. The results may offer policymakers insights into addressing an important contributor to disparities in child skill development. “Neuroscience clearly shows that building early brain connections in children relies on the nurturing ‘serve…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

People Who Suffered In Past More Likely To Get Praised For Good Deeds In Future: Study

A team of researchers from the University of Missouri have discovered that people tend to give more praise to someone for their good deeds as an adult after discovering that person has also had to overcome adversity or suffering earlier in life, such as abuse and neglect as a child. The findings of the study were published in the ‘Journal of Experimental Social Psychology’. Philip Robbins, an associate professor and chair of the Department of Philosophy in the MU College of Arts and Science, said these findings can help to narrow a knowledge gap found in both psychology and philosophy, two disciplines that study human behaviour. “Historically, psychology and philosophy have had a stronger focus on the ‘dark’ side of human behaviour, such as moral wrongdoing, and less attention has been placed on studying the ‘light’ side of human behaviour, such as acts of…

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Morality Demonstrated In Stories Influence Early Adolescents: Study

A new study has looked at how exposure to media content featuring specific moral values (care, fairness, loyalty and authority) might influence the weight kids place on those values. The findings of the study were published in the ‘Journal of Media Psychology’. The main study showed that exposure to books emphasising four separate moral values increased the salience of their respective intuitions in early adolescents. An important lesson in the moral education of children could be as close as the book in their hands. Stories matter. And they can play a role in shifting the importance of particular moral values in young audiences, according to the results of a new study. “Media can distinctly influence separate moral values and get kids to place more or less importance on those values depending on what is uniquely emphasised in that content,” said Lindsay Hahn, PhD, an…

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Study Suggests People Enjoy Deep Conversations With Strangers

According to the findings of new research, even though people often stick to small talk with strangers because they underestimate how much others are interested in their lives, but they can actually benefit from deep and meaningful conversations that help to forge connections with one another. Published by the American Psychological Association, the findings of the study appear in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. “Connecting with others in meaningful ways tends to make people happier, and yet people also seem reluctant to engage in deeper and more meaningful conversation,” said Nicholas Epley, PhD, a professor of behavioural science at the University Of Chicago Booth School Of Business. Epley, who is also a co-author of the study, continued, “This struck us as an interesting social paradox: If connecting with others in deep and meaningful ways increases well-being, then why aren’t people doing it…

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Study Shows Free Play May Help Infants Learn, Develop

A new study by researchers at New York University has identified everyday inputs to infants’ natural learning by examining free play outside the confines of lab settings and pre-selected toys. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Child Development’. The benefits of object play (blocks, puzzles, cars, dolls and so on) for infant learning and development are well documented. However, nearly nothing is known about how natural play unfolds in the ecologically valid home environment (real-life settings). Indeed, research on infant play is limited to structured tasks in child-friendly lab environments, where infants engage with predetermined objects for a fixed amount of time. Although structured observations illuminate how infants explore, interact, and learn with novel objects under controlled conditions, they reveal little about how infants spontaneously play in their everyday environments. “Our findings show an essential first step in identifying the…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Couples Really Are Together In Sickness And In Health

According to a recent cohort study that looked at Dutch and Japanese marriages, a couple’s health is surprisingly intertwined. The study published in the journal ‘Atherosclerosis’ discovered that spouses have a high degree of commonality in not only lifestyle habits, but body shape, blood pressure, and even incidences of some diseases. When it comes to marriage, the adage “birds of a feather flock together” is relatively true. Previous studies have indicated that we gravitate towards people of similar social class, educational background, race, and weight. The scientific name for this is assertive mating, and it means that spouses are often genetically similar. This allows researchers to explore environmental factors in greater detail. Researchers examined 5,391 pairs from Japan and 28,265 from the Netherlands, drawing on data from the Tohoku Medical Megabank Project, and the Lifelines study in the Netherlands. Couples from both countries shared…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Reasons We Cheat On Our Romantic Partners

There is nothing worse than discovering that your partner has cheated on you. A good romantic relationship builds on mutual trust, respect, admiration, and attraction. When a loved one commits an act of infidelity, the bond of trust has been broken. You probably no longer feel respected or admired. Worst of all, you may no longer feel that your significant other is attracted to you. Despite these potentially devastating consequences, we often cheat on our partners. Why are so many of us unfaithful? Here are the top reasons: We crave excitement and unpredictability Most of us think that the “honeymoon phase” of relationships is what romantic love is supposed to be like all the time. We fail to see that the early stages of romantic relationships are not what healthy romantic love is like. Once the ecstasy, excitement, and unpredictability of the honeymoon phase of our romantic relationship are gone,…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Conversation Starter Topics To Have A Good Virtual Date

In the world of virtual dating, it can be hard to think of ideas to go beyond ‘hey’ or ‘hello’, but nothing beats the chemistry of a good conversation to calm the nerves! Your first (virtual) date should be lighthearted and a two-way street. The easiest way to do so is to ask questions that matter to you and check your partner’s interest in the same. All in all, don’t be afraid to be yourself, after all the aim is to find someone as like-minded (or goofy) as you are. Having introduced people to their love stories for over two decades from all around the world, dating app OkCupid lists down conversation starters that will get you and your date talking! ‘What’s something that you really want to do?’ Being able to uninhibitedly discuss your dreams, goals, and desires on a first date can…

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Ankita Konwar Talks About Healing And Self-Love

Milind Soman’s wife Ankita Konwar believes that healing is a process, and we need to embrace it to understand the journey our body and mind takes. The 30-year-old, who is a fitness enthusiast just like her husband, often talks about the importance of staying mentally and physically healthy. She even shares inspiring videos with her fans to motivate them. Her latest Instagram reel also talks about the same. Taking to Instagram on Tuesday, Ankita shared a video of herself in which she answered the question, “Who got her smiling like that?” The video is a mashup of different clips of Ankita that show her doing various activities that she loves, like swimming, yoga, cycling, running, and more. Ankita captioned the post, “Healing is a process, embrace it! #healing #loveyourself #feelitreelit #reelsindia,” and we agree. The video sends out the vital message of self-love and giving yourself time to heal from past wounds.…

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Research Reveals Parental Alienation, Partner Abuse Are Similar

According to a new study, parental alienating behaviours and coercively controlling abuse are similar. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Personal Relationships’. Abusive intimate relationships are sometimes characterised by a power imbalance, with the abuser maintaining control over the abused party by limiting their financial, social and other choices. This is known as coercive control, or battery when severe physical abuse is involved. But what happens when the abuser uses the couple’s children as a weapon of control? This particular situation has a name — parental alienating behaviours — and Colorado State University social psychologist Jennifer Harman has devoted much of her career to bringing awareness to the issue via scientific inquiry. Parental alienating behaviours are those in which a parent tries to baselessly turn a child against the other parent, usually during a divorce or separation, through actions like…

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How People Find Love

Finding a partner with whom to share your life can be a hopeful, difficult, invigorating, and challenging process. Seeking an appropriate mate is considered as one of the primary responsibilities of adulthood, and whether their approach is to flirt in line at a coffee shop, peruse hundreds of online profiles, or ask friends or family to arrange dates, people devote enormous amounts of thought and energy to the task. To find someone you’ll be comfortable with for the rest of your life, though, it may be necessary to go far outside your comfort zone. The Laws of Attraction Human attraction is driven by biological and evolutionary factors, but it can also be idiosyncratic. We may find ourselves attracted to many people, at least momentarily. Determining whether our interest in or connection with someone reflects a temporary infatuation or true love can sometimes be challenging,…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Planning To Propose Your Partner? Things To Look Out For

“When you know, you know.” You must’ve heard this so many times – in your regular conversations or even in the rom-com that you may have binge-watched on. But what does it mean, really? This simple advice, all of four words, might sound too vague. Removing the rose-tinted glasses from the vision of marriage, let’s talk about the realities you need to consider to figure out if you’re ready to pop the question. Marriage might seem like fun and romance, in anticipation of living with the person you love, but it can also get difficult on matters you might not have touched upon or don’t have a common understanding on. It comes with a lot of responsibility and sacrifices. If you are planning to propose to your partner anytime soon, here’s a few things that will help you.  Do You Share Similar Values And Goals? Love is important in…

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Study Examines Relationship Between Eye Contact & Conversation

A recent study suggested making and breaking eye contact while talking to someone makes a conversation more engaging. Washington [US], September 12 : These findings have been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Making repeated eye contact when talking to someone is common, but why do people do it? According to the findings of a new Dartmouth study, when two people are having a conversation, eye contact occurs during moments of “shared attention” when both people are engaged, with their pupils dilating in synchrony as a result. “Eye contact is really immersive and powerful. When two people are having a conversation, eye contact signals that shared attention is high- that they are in peak synchrony with one another. As eye contact persists, that synchrony then decreases,” said lead author Sophie Wohltjen, a graduate student in psychological and brain sciences at…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

How New-Age Matrimonial Sites Are Turning More Secure

What are the three words that everyone wants to hear these days, apart from the ones that we can easily predict? – It’s a match? (Well, almost three.) Indeed, be it a matter of dating or of marriage, a match is what everyone’s looking for. Gone are the days when a wing mate would provide support to someone. Now, that role lies with technology, precisely a compatibility algorithm powered by artificial intelligence (AI). We have heard about AI in our cars and phones to whatnot, and now, the same technology is helping people find love or a life partner. The world is changing rapidly and although a few websites did make it easy for people to find their life partners, there was still something missing in the entire process. People were sometimes conned by false details, or the fee involved was too high for people to subscribe to them.…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study: Relationship Satisfaction, Love, Intimacy Have Lowered Post Lockdown

The findings of a new study on dating and married couples in India who were surveyed before and after India’s COVID-19 lockdown, suggested that relationship satisfaction, love, intimacy, and passion have significantly lowered post lockdown. The study, which was published in Family Relations, found that commitment among those who were dating remained unaffected. For those who were dating, watching movies together and revisiting old memories were activities associated with love. For married couples, doing household chores, cooking, and watching movies together were associated with love. The study included 100 participants (65 dating and 35 married) who were surveyed in two waves, first in January-March and then in May after the lockdown. “Love in relationships has been collateral damage to COVID-19. How couples spent time with each other is the key to maintain love. Watching movies together, reminiscing positive experiences, and sharing housework led to…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

How To Love Yourself

Your mind can be your closest ally or your worst enemy. How often has the tiny critic in your head held you back? Self-care is making your thoughts and feelings a priority each day of your life. Looking after yourself involves supporting your mental health, eating healthy, being physically active, developing self-awareness, and avoiding risks that could impair your well-being. Loving yourself can be tough. It is possible to be kind to yourself when the sun’s shining, but self-care can be a tough routine to follow when nothing’s going your way. Practising self-care can help improve your mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual well-being so that you can count on yourself when you need to most. Self-care can be a powerful tool when it is put into use as a daily reminder of activities and behaviours that nurture your soul, rather than as an emergency…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Leaders Become Successful When Able To Mentally Reattach To Work: Study

Getting into the right mindset for work can set the tone for the rest of your day – and it’s an especially beneficial practice for managers.  The findings of a new study suggest that on the days that leaders and managers were better able to reattach to work in the morning, they experienced higher positive moods and work focus, allowing them to be more successful throughout the day. The findings of the study were published in the ‘Journal of Vocational Behavior’. Getting into the right mindset for work can set the tone for the rest of your day – and it’s an especially beneficial practice for managers, the Portland State University study found. Mentally reconnecting to work – thinking about what you want to accomplish that day, what’s on your day’s agenda or what situations you might encounter before you even open your work email – better prepares…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

People often avoid feeling compassion for others

Washington [US], September 5 : Researchers during a series of studies found that given the option, people often chose to avoid feeling compassion for others. They also reported that doing so was mentally effortful and which were linked to their choices.The findings of the studies were published in the ‘Journal of Experimental Psychology.’ The researchers also found that if the situation involved a person they were close to, such as a family member, people were more likely to choose to feel compassion and that being compassionate in this context was easier.Julian Scheffer, a Penn State graduate and postdoctoral research fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, said the findings suggest a need for new ways to encourage people to open themselves up to feeling compassion for others — especially in times of division and hardship.“Experiencing compassion often leads to wanting to help others and…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Study Finds If Distressed, Help-Seeking Couples Improve On Their Own

A new study has sought to examine what happens to couples who seek online help for their relationship but have to wait six months before beginning an intervention program. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Family Process’. “Given the ways couple dynamics affect individuals, any children, and the broader community, knowing how to support couples experiencing distress is a key area of interest for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers,” explained Allen Barton, assistant professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies at the University of Illinois, and lead author on the study. “This research aims to provide insights into the dynamics and trajectories of distressed couples. We wanted to see if these relationships continued to deteriorate, remained the same, or started to improve on their own,” added Barton. The study included a nationwide sample of 221 couples assigned to…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Here’s How Isolation Affects People’s Social Interaction, Especially Amid Covid

The scholars speculate that acute isolation may not be enough to significantly influence males’ sexual motivation with females or aggressive motivation with other males. But it can have a strong effect on the craving for affiliative social contact thought to motivate females’ social interaction. The findings of a new Cornell University research suggested that female mice exhibit a strong drive to socialise with other females following periods of acute isolation, significantly increasing their production of social calls that are akin to human emotional vocalisations. The researchers, whose study was published in PLOS ONE, said their behaviour suggests a promising pathway for understanding the brain mechanisms through which isolation affects people’s social motivation and mental health – a growing concern during the Covid-19 pandemic. “That kind of social interaction between female mice is the most equivalent to our daily interactions with other people,” said Katherine…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

People Often Avoid Feeling Compassion For Others, Feel It’s A Lot Of Effort: Study

In a series of studies, the researchers found that when given the option, people often chose to avoid feeling compassion for others and reported that doing so was mentally effortful, which were linked to their choices. The findings of the studies were published in the ‘Journal of Experimental Psychology’. The researchers also found that if the situation involved a person they were close to, such as a family member, people were more likely to choose to feel compassion and that being compassionate in this context was easier. Julian Scheffer, a Penn State graduate and postdoctoral research fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, said the findings suggest a need for new ways to encourage people to open themselves up to feeling compassion for others — especially in times of division and hardship. “Experiencing compassion often leads to wanting to help others and improve their…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

How Parents Can Be ‘Emotion Coaches’ As Kids Go To School During Covid-19

Parents should take time to talk with their children before school starts amid Covid-19. For an anxious child, this might be five minutes of validation and support each day. For another child, checking in occasionally may be enough. Here are some tips for ’emotion coaching’ As children head back to school, families are once again facing a September of uncertainty. This worry is compounded by depressive and anxiety symptoms in children and adolescents that have doubled in the past 18 months. Our team has been studying the mental health of children and families since the start of the pandemic to develop strategies that support those who are struggling. Getting kids back in the classroom is an important step. However, we must not forget the well-being of families, as children are most successful when they are jointly supported in both the classroom and at home.…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Why Is It Important To Set Boundaries In A Relationship

Boundaries describe where one thing ends and another begins. Similarly, relationship boundaries help each person figure out where one person ends and the other begins. In short, boundaries help you define what you are comfortable with and how you would like to be treated by others. Boundaries can also be described as how emotionally or physically close you let people get to you. Before getting into how you can fix these boundaries, let’s understand some of the common signs you might have boundary issues in your relationship: • You feel like your partner is too involved in your business.• You often find yourself sucked into pointless fighting or debating regularly.• When in trouble, you have to save them and fix their problems for them.• You find each other far more invested or attracted to each other than you should.• And the most common sign that…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Ways To Deal With Friendship Breakup

Whether it is for answering our frantic calls in the middle of the night or being there when we need them by our side, most of us rely on our friends for almost everything. They know the real version of us, which could be messy, needy, and even mean, yet they choose to love us for it. But for several reasons which we might not even be able to decipher at times, friendships fall apart. All of us are painstakingly familiar with the concept of loss. And while the reasons and magnitude of each loss may vary, losing a friend is never easy. 1. Don’t try to force closure Closure feels like an emotionally healthy thing to seek – but it has to come naturally, and when you’re both calm. If you’re in the thick of a dramatic breakup with your best friend, it…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Pay Attention To These Red Flags In A Relationship

How would you react if somebody told you that you could actually predict if your partner is the right one for you or not? Sounds too good to be true right! But this can happen only if you are aware and notice the red flags at the initial stage in your relationship! What Are The Red Flags? No matter how beautiful and in love they make us feel, relationships are complicated! They are unpredictable as you don’t know what really lies ahead. But wouldn’t it be an amazing process if you could predict and analyze whether your partner is ‘the one for you or not’? Of course, there aren’t any superpowers to gauge this, all you need to do is pay attention to some subtle yet essential red flags! Enlisted below is a glimpse at some of these signs to help you notice whether…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Signs Your Partner Really Cares For You

As we move through this life, we attach ourselves to people we think will bring us comfort and support. While this doesn’t always prove true, when we’re lucky we run into the right person who believes in us and cares for us genuinely. Is your partner someone who cares for you deeply? Are they there for you in your lowest moments and celebrating with you in your triumphs? Awareness is one of the primary keys to any happy relationship. When we’re invested in someone who really cares about us, there’s a number of signs we can look out for. From a pattern of actively listening to unconditional acceptance, and a willing accountability — true care is demonstrated not just in our words, but the way in which we behave with our partners as well. Signs your partner really cares for you:- Actively listening Active…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Texting Habits That Ruins Your Relationship

Bad texting habits are considered a veritable communication problem in a relationship. If you text too often, it can cause annoyance. If you text less, you could be called indifferent by your SO. Experts say that if a couple is not careful about their texting habits, it can even lead to a split. Needless to say, bad texting habits pose miscommunication and misunderstanding threats. There are even studies that have looked into texting issues. A few years ago, researchers at Brigham Young University in the US studied 276 young adults across America and showed in their paper that technology can create some serious disruptions in committed relationships. In their report, published in the Journal of Couple and Relationship Therapy, the researchers showed that for women, text messages, where they are apologising or pleading for resolution of differences, are associated with lower relationship quality. On…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Covid-19 Pandemic Resulted In Increased Rates Of Intimate Partner Aggression

According to a new study led by Georgia State University researchers, the implementation of shelter-in-place restrictions due to the pandemic has resulted in increased rates of physical and psychological aggression among couples. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Psychology of Violence’. The study found that the pandemic resulted in a six-to-eightfold increase in rates of intimate partner aggression across the US.Physical aggression increased from two acts per year before the pandemic to 15 acts per year once shelter-in-place restrictions began. Psychological aggression increased from 16 acts per year to 96 acts per year. The findings indicated that stress related to the pandemic was strongly associated with the perpetration of intimate partner aggression, even among individuals considered at low risk. “If you think about it, that [increase] represents an enormous shift in people’s day-to-day lives,” said the study’s lead author Dominic…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

How To Deal With An Angry Partner

Anger is a powerful emotion that can cause untold destruction if it continues unchecked. Just like a forest fire, which destroys towering trees, houses, and lives in its path, so it is with anger which gets out of control. So if you are wondering how to control anger in a relationship or how to deal with an angry spouse, then read on. Ways that can be helpful when you are dealing with an angry partner: 1. Do keep calm Want to learn the secret of how to deal with an angry husband or how to deal with an angry wife? It’s simple – maintain your calm and composure. Admittedly this may not be easy to do, especially when your angry spouse is lashing out at you, but the calmer you can remain, the quicker your partner will get over his or her outburst. Keeping calm is a temporary strategy…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

5 Ways To Let Your Crush Know You’re Into Them

Having a crush on someone who makes your heart flutter is fun. There’s nothing that can compare to that feeling when your crush walks into the room or when you two can’t stop talking to one another, but how do you let your crush know you’re into them? Whether it’s a crush on a coworker or a crush on a friend, you can’t seem to get your mind off them. What do you do with this healthy love obsession? The next logical step probably is to let them know you are interested. However, this is the part that’s not so easy. It’s effortless to daydream about you two kissing, but it’s another story when you have to make that dream into a reality. Here are the way you can let your crush know you are feeling them: 1. Write Them A Love Note Actions sometimes speak louder than…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Having A Good Listener Improves Brain Health: Study

Researchers observed that simply having someone available most or all of the time whom you can count on to listen to you when you need to talk is a measure of your brain’s ability to function better than would be expected for the amount of physical ageing, or disease-related changes in the brain. The findings of a new study suggest that supportive social interactions during adulthood are important for one’s ability to stave off cognitive decline despite brain ageing or neuropathological changes such as those present in Alzheimer’s disease. In the study published in JAMA Network Open, researchers observed that simply having someone available most or all of the time whom you can count on to listen to you when you need to talk is associated with greater cognitive resilience, a measure of your brain’s ability to function better than would be expected for the amount of physical ageing, or disease-related…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Ways To Avoid Boredom In Your Relationship

When you’ve been in a relationship for a long time, experts say it’s pretty common to feel a sense of boredom. In many cases, there’s really nothing to worry about. But if you’re wondering how to not get bored in a relationship, there are some pretty effective ways to prevent it, and keep things interesting as time goes by. Determine What Boredom In A Relationship Really Looks Like For Each Partner Everyone has their own idea of what’s boring to them. That’s why a 2013 study published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships found that it’s important to clearly define what “boredom” in a relationship looks like to each partner. If it’s a lack of interest in your partner, which was the number one reason why people got bored, compatibility may be the issue. However, if it’s something like loss of excitement, fun, or surprises, that’s something couples…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Dissimilar Students Can Become Friends By Being Assigned To Sit Together: Study

A study conducted in Hungarian schools showed that seating students next to each other boosted their tendency to become friends–both for pairs of similar students and pairs of students who differed in their educational achievement, gender, or ethnicity. The findings of the study were published in the open-access journal ‘PLOS ONE’. According to earlier research, proximity between people can promote friendships. However, people also tend to become friends with those who have similar characteristics, such as gender, age, and ethnicity. It is unclear how these two phenomena interact; specifically, whether the similarity between individuals influences the effects of proximity on friendship. To explore this question, Julia Rohrer of the University of Leipzig, Germany, and colleagues conducted an experiment in which they created randomised classroom seating charts for 2,966 students in grades 3 through 8 across 40 schools in rural Hungary. The students remained in…

Health & Lifestyle Relationship

Expressive Writing Reduces Relationship Conflict & Aggression During Pandemic: Study

According to a new research from USF’s St. Petersburg campus, individuals who wrote about their relationship troubles during the pandemic from the point of view of a neutral observer had less conflict and aggression with their partner. The findings of the study were published in the journal ‘Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice’. Led by Associate Professor of Psychology Lindsey Rodriguez, the study surveyed 716 American adults across the US and at the height of the pandemic lockdowns. Participants, who were divided equally among males and females, were asked to fill out a baseline assessment to measure the frequency, duration and intensity of conflicts in the relationship, followed by a brief writing exercise. Some individuals were asked to write about a recent disagreement in their relationship from the point of view of a neutral third party who had the couples’ best interest in…